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Technical education plays a vital role in human resource development of the country by creating skilled manpower, enhancing industrial productivity and improving the quality of life.

Indias transition to a knowledge-based economy requires a new generation of educated and skilled people. Its competitive edge will be determined by its peoples ability to create, share, and use knowledge effectively. A knowledge economy requires India to develop workers - knowledge workers and knowledge technologists - who are flexible and analytical and who can be the driving force for innovation and growth.

Two greatest concerns of employers today are finding good workers and training them. The difference between the skills needed on the job and those possessed by applicants, sometimes called the skills-gap, is of real concern to human resource managers and business owners looking to hire competent employees. While employers would prefer to hire people who are trained and ready to go to work, they are usually willing to provide the specialized, job-specific training necessary for those lacking such skills.

India has a large population base of 1.14 billion with demographic shift in favor of working age group (15-59 years) while the overall population is projected to grow at 1.4% over the next five years the working age is expected to grow at 2.15%.

For this majority group, access to secondary education and VET is crucial and for most of them secondary education and VET will be the last stage of their formal schooling. An effective school to work transition for these young people, made possible by higher quality secondary and tertiary education and VET, will improve their employment prospects and lifetime earnings.

Quality assurance and effective Quality assurance models can play a decisive role in modernising vocational education and training (VET), and improving performance and attractiveness, achieving better value for money. However we should realise that there is a need to increase VET responsiveness to changing labour market demands, increasing the effectiveness of VET outcomes in improving the match between education and training demand and supply. Across the country, we also need to achieve better levels of employability for the workforce and to improve access to training, especially for vulnerable labour market groups.

An approach to education based on skill development which is human and Indian in essence, perspective and content that serves our needs of effective and qualitative education, employability and self employability is being pursued. Such an approach would certainly be globally competitive and participative too. In a fast changing world, we need to stand tall, upright and be counted. Effective skill based technical education for employment is the key and the vehicle.

Vocational Education in India
Formal VE in India is implemented at senior secondary school level, and funded by the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD), Government of India.

There are 9,583 schools offering 150 vocational courses of two-year duration in broad areas of primary, secondary, and tertiary sectors of the economy. In addition, National Institute of Open Schooling (NIOS) also imparts VE in 80 courses.

Total enrolment in VE courses of all these schools is roughly 6,00 000.

Objectives of Vocational Education
BR&Dge skill gap and provide trained manpower to various emerging service sectors in India.

Strive towards development of skilled manpower for diversified sector through short term, structured job oriented Courses.

Prepare the youth for a vocation of their choice;

Build a formidable work force of international quality for Demand not only in India but also in all other countries.

Reduce unemployment by supplying world-class skilled people.

Reduce cost and improve productivity of services and manufacturing by providing skilled manpower to international standards.

Need for Vocational Education
Water tight educational entry and exit levels

Increasing drop outs

Social non acceptance to Vocational Education as an alternate to higher education.

Loss of productive youth

Over qualified youth and non availability of appropriate jobs.

Mismatch between Qualifications and Industry needs.

Need to provide seamless integration between Vocational education and Regular Higher Education

Enhancement in GER

Potential Vocational Education Receptors
Automobile sector

IT, ITES and Telecom Sector

Media and Entertainment Sector

Hospitality and Tourism Sector

Construction and Infrastructure Sector

Financial Services, Banking and Insurance Sector

Model for Vocational Education
Full Multi point Entry and Exit between Formal system, Higher vocational Education system or Appropriate Job sector.

Entry level: 9 std. Pass
Level A 500 Hrs modular / Yr (Eq to X of formal education)
Level B 500 Hrs modular / Yr (Eq to XI of formal education)
Level C 500 Hrs modular / Yr (Eq to XII of formal education)

Each 500 Hrs to be treated as possible 10 modules of 50 Hr Duration each out of which at-least 50% would be competency based skill modules.

After Level A, B, C Vocational XII to be awarded.

Branch out to appropriate Job or further education of Higher Vocational Education or Formal Education

Level D 500 Hrs modular / Yr
Level E 500 Hrs modular / Yr
Level F 500 Hrs modular / Yr (Eq to a possible Technical Diploma)

Each 500 Hrs to be treated as possible 10 modules of 50 Hr Duration each out of which at-least 50% would be competency based skill modules.

After Level D, E, F Vocational Bachelors to be awarded

Branch out to appropriate Job or further education of Higher Vocational Education or Formal Education

Level G 500 Hrs modular / Yr
Level G 500 Hrs modular / Yr (Eq to a possible Technical Degree)

After Level G, H, Vocational Post Graduation to be awarded

Each 500 Hrs to be treated as possible 10 modules of 50 Hr Duration each out of which at-least 50% would be competency based skill modules.

Branch out to appropriate Job or further education of Higher Vocational Education or Formal Education

*A formal Education student would also be able to enter the competency based Vocational Education at appropriate levels.

 

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